The Robertson Genealogy Exchange

Selections from the Colonial and State Records of North Carolina
Concerning 126 Charles Robertson

126 Charles Robertson Takes His Seat in the Provincial Congress
at Halifax, North Carolina [from the Legislative Journal]

[924]

Tuesday, November 19th, 1776.

Met according to adjournment.

[925]

...Mr. Willie Jones moved that a Petition, laid before the Council of Safety in August last, from the settlers of Watauga, and District of

[926]

Washington, praying to be annexed to this State, &c., and a Resolution of said Council on that Petition be read. The same being read and debated, it was moved and seconded, that the three Persons, who now attend Congress to represent the settlers in Washington District, might be permitted to subscribe to the Test, and take their Seats, it being objected to, the Question was put, and carried in the affirmative, 153 to 1. Whereupon Mr. Charles Robeson, Mr. John Carter and Mr. John Haile, three of the Delegates from Watauga Settlement, and District of Washington, appeared; subscribed to the Test, and took their seats in Congress accordingly.

The Congress adjourned till To-morrow morning.

Source: William L. Saunders and Walter Clark, editors, The State and Colonial Records of North Carolina, 30 volumes (Raleigh, North Carolina: various publishers, 1886-1907), 10: 924-926.

126 Charles Robertson's Commission as 1st Major of Washington County

[992]

Monday, December 23d, 1776.

Met according to adjournment.

[998]

...Resolved, That John Carter be Colonel, John Sevier, Lieutenant Colonel, Charles Robeson 1st Major, and Jacob Womack, 2nd Major, for the District of Washington, and that the commissions issue accordingly.

Resolved, That Col. John Carter be supplied with 200 wt. of gun powder from the magazine in Halifax, for the defence of the District of Washington, and Mr. Christopher Dudley is hereby directed to furnish him with the same.

Source: Saunders and Clark, 10: 992 & 998.

Colonel Charles McDowell and 126 Major Charles Robertson to Treat with
the Cherokee Nation

[August 12, 1778]

[779]

General Rutherford, from the committee appointed to take under consideration the several letters and papers received from His Excellency, the Governor, relative to the Cherokee Indians, reported as follows:

It appears to your committee by the complaints of the said Indians that trespasses have been committed on the lands within their hunting, grounds, which if not timely prevented may involve this State in a second war with the said nation, and as your committee conceive that the most effectual method to remove the jealousies now subsisting among the said Indians would be to pass a law by this present Assembly impowering the Attorney General of this State to prosecute all offenders who may trespass or commit any depredations on the said Indians, and that no person in this State be suffered to trade or traffic with the said Indians unless they first obtain a license for so doing from the Judges of the Superior Courts of this State, and that His Excellency, the Governor, be requested to write to the Governors of the States of Virginia and South Carolina to use their influence in procuring acts to prevent persons from their States trading with the said Indians without licences from some civil authority, which your committee are of opinion would prevent the many abuses which at present prevail, your committee also recommend it to the General Assembly as their opinion that His Excellency, the Governor, be requested to transmit the substance of such act of Assembly, when passed, in a talk to be presented to the Chiefs or head men of the middle and

[780]

valley settlements of Cherokees by Col. Charles McDowell and Major Charles Robertson, and in which talk His Excellency, the Governor will be pleased to assure the Indians that this State will be ready at all times to hear their complaints and redress their grievances, and in return expect and hope that the strictest harmony and friendship may subsist between the said Indians and the good people of this State.

Your Committee are also of opinion that the Superintendant of Indian Affairs cannot render that service to this State that might be expected unless he resides in the Indian Nation therefore recommend it to the General Assembly that Mr. James Robertson, the Superintendant, be directed to reside in the said Cherokee Nation during his continuance
in office, all which is submitted.

GRIFFITH RUTHERFORD,
Chairman.

The House taking the said report into consideration, concurred therewith.

Ordered that the said report, together with the following Message be sent to the House of Commons:

Mr. Speaker and gentlemen of the House of Commons:

Herewith you will receive the report of the Joint Committee on Indian Affairs which this
House have considered and concurred with.

Received from the Commons the following Message: Mr. Speaker and Gentlemen of the
Senate:

We herewith send for your concurrence the report of the Joint Committee appointed to take into Consideration divers letters and Messages from and to the Continental Congress and certain other papers referred to the Assembly by His Excellency, the Governor.

Concurred with by this House except the seventh section.

[August 17, 1778]

[839]

Received from the Senate the following Message:

Mr. Speaker and Gentlemen of the House of Commons:

Herewith you will receive the report of the Joint Committee on Indian affairs, which this
House have considered and concurred with.

At the same time received the report referred to in the above Message, as follows :

The Joint Committee, appointed by both Houses to take under consideration the several letters and papers received from His Excellency, the Governor, relative to the Cherokee Indians, being met, and having chosen General Rutherford, Chairman, beg leave to report as follows:

It appears to your Committee by the complaints of the said Indian that trespasses have been committed on the lands within their hunting grounds, which if not timely prevented may involve this State in a second war with the said nation, and as your Committee conceive that the most effectual method to remove the jealouses now subsisting among the said Indians, would be to pass a Law, this present Assembly, impowering the Attorney General of this State to prosecute all offenders, which may trespass or commit any depredations on the said Indians, and that no person in this State be suffered to trade or traffick with the said Indians unless they first obtain a licence for so doing from the Judges of the Superior Courts of this State, and that His Excellency, the Governor, be requested to write to Governors of the States of Virginia and South Carolina to use their influence in procuring acts, to prevent persons from their States trading with the said Indians

[840]

without licences from some Civil authority, which your Committee are of opinion would prevent the many abuses which at present prevail. Your Committee, also recommend it to the General Assembly as their opinion that His Excellency, the Governor, be requested to transmit the substance of such act of Assembly when passed, in a talk to be presented to the Chiefs or head men, of the middle and valley settlements, of the Cherokees, by Colonel Charles McDowell and Major Charles Robertson, in which talk His Excellency, the Governor, will be pleased to assure the Indians that this State will be ready at all times to hear their complaints, and redress their grievances, and in return expect and hope that the strictest harmony and friendship may subsist between the said Indians and the good people of this State.

Your Committee are also of opinion that the superintendent of Indian Affairs cannot render that service to this State that might be expected unless he resides in the Indian Nation.

Therefore it recommend to the General Assembly that Mr. James Robertson, the Superintendant, be directed to reside in the said Cherokee Nation during his continuance
in office.

Concurred with.

Ordered that the following Message be sent to the Senate: Mr. Speaker and Gentlemen of the Senate:

We herewith return the report of the Joint Committee on Indian Affairs.

Concurred with by this House.

Source: Saunders and Clark, 12: 779-780 & 839-840.

126 Major Charles Robertson Commissioned as Lieutenant Colonel
and Sent on Expedition against the Chickamauga

[Wednesday, January 20, 1779]

[539]

Received from-tho Commons the following Message:

Mr. Speaker & Gentlemen of the Senate:

We herewith send for your Concurrence the Report of the joint Committee appointed to take under Consideration the letter from the Governor of Virginia to Governor Caswell,
&c.

Concurred with by this House. Also the Report therein referred to as follows :

The Committee appointed by both Houses to take under Consideration the letter from the Governor of Virginia respecting our aid to be sent to the frontiers, beg leave to report as follows:

It is the opinion of your Committee that two Hundred Men be immediately sent under one Lieutenant Colonel and four Captains to join Colo. Shelby, and that they be furnished from the Militia of Washington formed by Voluntary Enlistment, if they can be so procured, or by Draught agreeable to the Militia Law. That they be furnished with a Commissary, who shall be supplied with Money to enable him to accommodate the troops; that he give Bond to the Governor for the faithful performance of his Trust. That the Officers and Soldiers (should they be successful) treat Captive Women and Children with Tenderness and humanity, conducting them safely to some neighbourly friendly Tribe of the Cherokees & then supply them with live stock and such other of their provisions as they may think necessary. That they treat the friendly Tribes with the utmost Respect, and that they inform them as soon as the Situation of Affairs will permit of their Intentions.

The Committee further beg leave to recommend Major Charles Robeson to the Command, with the rank of Lieutenant Colonel, and that the Troops be furnished with two Hundred weight of Powder. All which is humbly submitted to the House.

THOS PERSON, for Committee.

The same being read, was Concurred with.

[540]

Received from the Senate the following Message:

Mr. Speaker & Gentlemen of the House of Commons:

We herewith send for your Concurrence a Resolve of this House for transporting Ammunition for the use of the Troops ordered against the Indians.

Mr. Speaker & Gentlemen of the House of Commons:

You will herewith receive for your Concurrence a Resolve of this House appointing Mr. Jesse Walton Commissary to the Troops under the Command of Colo. Robertson on the Indian Expedition.

At the same time received the Resolves referred to in the above Message, and the same being read were concurred with.

[541]

Thursday, 21st January, 1779.

The House met.

[542]

...Mr. Speaker & Gentlemen of the House of Commons:

We herewith send for your Concurrence a Resolve of this House

[543]

for transporting Ammunition for [t]he Use of the Troops ordered against the Indians.

Resolved, That Mr. Jesse Walton be appointed Commissary to the Troops now ordered on the Indian Expedition under the Command of Colo. Robeson.

Ordered that the above Resolve be sent to the Commons, together wiyh the following Message:

Mr. Speaker & Gentlemen of the House of Commons:

You will herewith receive for your Concurrence a Resolve of this House appointing Mr. Jesse Walton, Commissary to the Troops, under the Command of Colo. Robeson, on the Indian Expedition.

Source: Saunders and Clark, 12: 539-543.

N.B.: Although a few researchers have recently asserted that the Major and Colonel Charles Robertson in these records was 1223 Charles Robertson, 1221 General James Robertson's younger brother, the claim is without merit. In a sworn statement dated October 3, 1832, 1263 William Robertson said that "...he was...drafted under Capt W. Parker for three months during which time he acted as Lieutenant and marched under Genl Evan Shelby against the Cherokee Indians." He continued, "My father, [126] Charles Robertson, was Colonel. We went to an Indian town called Chickamauga. The Indians fled before us. We burned their town and returned home." A full chapter is devoted to the Chickamauga Campaign in Samuel Cole Williams' Tennessee During the Revolutionary War (New York: Press of the Pioneers, 1944).

Last updated: Thursday, October 16, 2003

All original material Copyright ©2003 Tom Robertson. All rights reserved including those of electronic transmission and reproduction of the material in any format.

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